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San Marcos Chapel & Vista Chapel

Common Questions About Cremation

Cremation is not a final disposition process. It is another step in the memorialization process.

After cremation takes place, families need to make a choice for the final disposition of the cremated remains. Final disposition options include placing the cremated remains in a decorative urn to be displayed in the home or in a niche or columbarium, burying the cremated remains in a cemetery, or scattering the cremated remains.

Our Allen Brothers staff will explain the various options for your loved one's final disposition.

 

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Yes, you can carry cremated remains with you on an airline. Some airlines do not accept cremated remains as checked luggage. You must contact the airline directly to verify this. If you plan to transport an urn as a carry-on item, the urn must be able to pass through the x-ray scanner. You'll also need to carry proper documentation with you (certified death certificate, certificate of cremation, etc.). If the urn cannot be scanned, it will not be permitted on the flight. Under no circumstances will a TSA employee open an urn to inspect its contents, even if the family insists.

The TSA website states, "Some airlines do not allow cremated remains in checked bags, so please check with your airline to learn more about possible restrictions.  To facilitate screening, we suggest that you purchase a temporary or permanent crematory container made of a lighter weight material, such as wood or plastic. If the container is made of a material that generates an opaque image, TSA officers will not be able to clearly determine what is inside the container and the container will not be allowed. Out of respect for the deceased, TSA officers will not open a container, even if requested by the passenger."

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